Volume 18, No.1, Spring 2000

Features

A Missouri farmer explains why he's not planting it.
Peter Huber's new book, Hard Green, both supports and challenges free market environmentalism.

Columns

Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin Weitzman says that current income need be adjusted downward by 1 percent at most to account for the loss of exhaustible resources.

Perspectives

Linda Platts
Bananas are growing in a mine drainage tunnel in Leadville, Colo. Along with carrots, spinach, beets, and broccoli, these crops may provide the solution to cleaning up one of the nation's most polluted Superfund sites.
Linda Platts
Breaching the Edwards Dam on Maine's Kennebec River last July to help fish had an unexpected benefit for furniture-makers, wood craftsmen, architects, musical instrument-makers, and even pen-makers.
Linda Platts
Once-denuded slopes in the foothills of the Himalayas are showing signs of green again.
Linda Platts
Nestled between a national park and a proposed wilderness area and cut through by the beautiful Virgin River, Utah's Horse Valley Ranch is probably one of the West's most coveted pieces of real estate.
Linda Platts
Bananas are growing in a mine drainage tunnel in Leadville, Colo. Along with carrots, spinach, beets, and broccoli, these crops may provide the solution to cleaning up one of the nation's most polluted Superfund sites.
Linda Platts
Plastics made from plants is an idea that scientists have touted for years, but no one was able to bring it to the marketplace. That has changed with an announcement from Cargill Incorporated and Dow Chemical Company.