Volume 27, No.2, Summer 2009

Features

Roger Meiners, Andrew Morriss
An aggressive push for a green economy is underway in the United States. Policymakers routinely assert that “green jobs” can simultaneously improve environmental quality and reduce unemployment.
H. Spencer Banzhaf
In 1982, some 450 activists were arrested protesting the construction of a hazardous waste facility in Warren County, N.C., a primarily poor, black community.
Robert Deacon
Morro Bay is a picturesque coastal community in central California. The town’s most prominent physical feature is Morro Rock, the remnant of an ancient volcano, which stands at the entrance to the bay that gives the town its name.
Patty Limerick
Through the vitality and wisdom of his written words, Wallace Stegner remains an influential presence in the American West.
Saws are buzzing on national forests, but these are not your typical logging operations. Instead of taking down big trees for shipments to lumber mills, loggers are cutting saplings and clearing brush from the understory.

Columns

Daniel Benjamin
Secure property rights are central to economic prosperity. It was the emergence of secure property rights that laid the foundation for the Industrial Revolution and the subsequent explosion of per capita incomes.
Terry Anderson
Of course, President Obama is “green.” These days, it’s hard to find anyone or anything that isn’t. Barack and Michelle have their organic White House garden. George “dubya” has solar panels at his ranch.

Perspectives

Linda Platts
Some farmers go to work on a tractor and some drive a truck, but in San Francisco and a growing roster of other American cities, farmers hop the bus to work or show up on their bicycles with their hoes in tow.
La Monica Everett-Haynes
The United States must come to terms with its lavish use of water and, at the same time, figure out serious solutions to the immediate problem related to access to water.
Linda Platts
Let’s face it. Even in a world where we share the intimate details of our lives online, some things are still private.
I’m torn. Some of my fondest Montana memories come from days of fly-fishing publicly accessed streams. In contrast, I’ve also conducted redd counts on one of the state’s most highly contested “stream access” streams and witnessed first-hand the natural resource benefits of privatization.
Jonathan Adler
Property rights advocates have long argued that the Endangered Species Act (ESA) effectively forces a handful of property owners to provide the “public good” of species habitat at private expense.
Linda Platts
As the push for green energy continues to gain momentum, new wind and solar projects are popping up as quickly as dandelions.