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Daniel Benjamin
ECONOMIST, n. a scoundrel whose faulty vision sees things as they really are, not as they ought to be.—after Ambrose Bierce By Daniel K. Benjamin
Daniel Benjamin
September 2007Volume 25 | Number 3 ECONOMIST, n. a scoundrel whose faulty vision sees things as they really are, not as they ought to be.—after Ambrose Bierce
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin PERC Reports, June 2007
Daniel Benjamin
Do single-issue voters matter? Recent evidence suggests that, when the issue is the environment, the answer is “yes.”
Daniel Benjamin
Reducing pollution is not the only factor to be considered when it comes to lowering infant mortality rates passion.
Daniel Benjamin
Urban sprawl did not increase as fast as expected between 1976 and 1992 -- in fact, it did not increase at all.
Daniel Benjamin
Economic evidence reveals that property rights are more critical for prosperity than an efficient method of settling contractual disputes.
Daniel Benjamin
Does a firm's pollution harm its reputation? You might think so, but recent research by Jonathan Karpoff, John Lott Jr., and Eric Wehrly argues otherwise.
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin
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By Daniel K. Benjamin
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A scholarly article supports Environmental Protection Agency regulation of air pollutants.
Daniel Benjamin
Suspicions about the Endangered Species Act are confirmed.
Daniel Benjamin
High demand for wood products can foster the resurgence of forests.
Daniel Benjamin
A study of Wyoming oil drilling reveals that regulatory costs are higher on federal land.
Daniel Benjamin
A major study of the Clean Air Act confirms that -- as businesses often claim -- the costs are high.
Daniel Benjamin
A market approach to conservation: Buy land.
Daniel Benjamin
Environmental Protection Agency regulations can kill people.
Daniel Benjamin
If congressional efforts to curtail interstate trash disposal succeed, costs will go up.
Daniel Benjamin
Benjamin. Daniel K. Benjamin reports that economists have come up with persuasive evidence that free trade reduces pollution.
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin Government-sponsored polar expeditions made fewer major discoveries introduced fewer innovations, lost more ships, and had more explorers die.
Daniel Benjamin
Politics, Costs, And Species
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin Given the racket that people raise over airport noise, one would think that the social benefits of  regulating airport noise must be great.
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin Weitzman says that current income need be adjusted downward by 1 percent at most to account for the loss of exhaustible resources.
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin EPA cleanups of superfund sites cost an average of $12 billion for every cancer case prevented.
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin Now we know what a decade of quotas on Japanese cars cost consumers.
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin Late 19th-century storm warnings from the U.S. Weather Service yielded substantial, positive net returns to society.
Daniel Benjamin
CONSEQUENCES OF CLIMATE CHANGE By Daniel K. Benjamin
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin The results of the SO2 tradable emissions program are in-- and the economists were right.
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin People are knowledgeable about the hazards faced by individuals in their age group.
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin More than half of the increased market share of light trucks stems from government regulation.
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin If these advances continue, solar energy will displace fossil fuels to a growing extent over the next fifty years.
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin Insecure property rights induce trespassers and forest owners to cut tress on short rotations and not to replant.
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin Unit pricing reduced the volume of garbage presented for collection by 37 percent.
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin
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By Daniel K. Benjamin
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Fracking concerns
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A cautionary tale of ozone regulation
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin
Daniel Benjamin
Property rights are essential for market exchange. The definition of those rights, their enforcement, and their transferability all help determine the extent of trade and the rate of economic development and wealth creation.
Daniel Benjamin
Just as the market brought the bison to near extinction, so too has it brought them back from the brink.
Daniel Benjamin
Waterborne diseases are responsible for 20 percent of deaths in children under the age of five. Microbes such as E. coli found in fecal matter cause diarrhea that kills by dehydrating its victims.
Daniel Benjamin
Economist, n. a scoundrel whose faulty vision sees things as they really are, not as they ought to be. —after Ambrose Bierce
Daniel Benjamin
In open-access settings, high quality resources are lucrative; yet keeping out potential entrants may be extremely costly.
Daniel Benjamin
More than 30 years after the homeless garbage barge Mobro 4000 put recycling on the front pages, recycling remains a poster child for many who consider themselves environmentalists.
Daniel Benjamin
Do people really care about improvements in the environment? As silly as this question might sound, it has proven remarkably difficult for economists to pin down a precise answer.
Daniel Benjamin
Secure property rights are central to economic prosperity. It was the emergence of secure property rights that laid the foundation for the Industrial Revolution and the subsequent explosion of per capita incomes.
Daniel Benjamin
Since 1980, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has had the authority to clean up hazardous waste sites that pose an imminent and substantial danger to public welfare and the environment.
Daniel Benjamin
The world’s ocean fisheries are in decline. Since 1950, nearly 30 percent of all fisheries have collapsed, and some scientists project that in 40 years, all of the world’s fisheries could collapse.
Daniel Benjamin
Economist, n. a scoundrel whose faulty vision sees things as they really are, not as they ought to be. —after Ambrose Bierce
Daniel Benjamin
Automobiles are responsible for most of the air pollution observed in Mexico City.
Daniel Benjamin
Property rights are pivotal for prosperity in Peru