Articles

September 2007By Alison Berry
PERC's Enviropreneur Camp Wins Top Prize for Social Entrepreneurship
East African Standard March 6, 2007 Applying free market ideas to wildlife conservation By Joseph Magiri
Holly Fretwell
By Holly Lippke Fretwell and Kimberly Frost Introduction
Editor's note: In the winter of 1988, Peter J. Hill, a PERC senior fellow and a professor of economics at Wheaton College of Wheaton, Illinois, wrote the following article on markets and morality.
Seattle Post-IntelligencerJune 19, 2006 By Matthew Daly
Donald Leal
Miliken Institute ReviewFebruary 2006
Terry Anderson
What's New at Hoover Hoover Institution January 2006
Steven F. Hayward
American Enterprise InstituteDecember 21, 2005   By Steven F. Hayward
Steven F. Hayward
has lent new momentum to the gloomy view of China's environmental future amidst its headlong rush for economic growth. However, the gloom over China's environment may be overstated.
Tim Fitzgerald
September 19, 2005 Hosted by PERC
By John K. Hosemann Introduction 
 PERC has won the Sir Antony Fisher International Memorial Award for the second year in a row. PERC was honored for publication of The Not So Wild, Wild West, a book by Terry L. Anderson and Peter J. Hill.
Earth Day is Cause for Celebration: Environmental Trends Mostly Positive By Steven Hayward with Michael De Alessi, Holly L. Fretwell, Brent Haglund, Joel Schwartz,
The New York TimesOpinion June 28, 2005 By John Tierney
Rocky Mountain News July 9, 2005 By C. Kenneth Orski and Jane S. Shaw
Jane Shaw
Rocky Mountain News July 9, 2005 By C. Kenneth Orski and Jane S. Shaw
The New York TimesOpinion June 25, 2005       By John Tierney
Exorbitant production costs, pervading stench raise concerns about"green" technology Environment & Climate News June 2005 By Greg McConnell
Richard Stroup
The InsiderSpring 2005 By James Gwartney, Richard L. Stroup, and Dwight R. Lee
Jane Shaw
Energy & Environment Vol. 16 No. 3&4 2005By Jane S. Shaw
Terry Anderson
Writers on the RangeMarch 29, 2005   By Jon Christensen and Terry Anderson
Environmental ForumJanuary/February 2005Minister of Change
Jane Shaw
Business Economics January 2005 Evidence of good environmental stewardship is more extensive than most economists and executives recognize. By Jane S. Shaw
Richard Stroup
Book Review Eco-nomics: What Everyone Should Know About Economics and the Environment By Richard Stroup Cato 2003  
Greenwire November 4, 2004Alex Kaplun Greenwire reporter
Land Letter October 28, 2004 By Allison A. Freeman Land Letter reporter
Terry Anderson
Case Western Reserve Law Review Fall 2004 Vol. 55:1By Terry L. Anderson
Terry Anderson, Dominic Parker
Hoover Digest2004 No.3 Summer By Terry L. Anderson and Dominic Parker
Terry Anderson
Hoover Digest2004 No.3 Summer Cooling the Global Warming Debate: By Terry L. Anderson
Dominic Parker, Walter Thurman
North Carolina State Economist July/August 2004
Jane Shaw
Conference Organized by PERC Klamath Falls, Oregon June 8, 2004 Summary
Holly Fretwell
From the Pacific Research Institute and the American Enterprise Institute Full Text PDF
Randy Simmons
By Randy T. Simmons and Kimberly Frost
Randy Simmons
Executive Summary By Randy T. Simmons and Kimberly Frost
Chapter 9: Protecting the Environment
Thomas Bray
Philanthropy Magazine January/February 2004 By Thomas J. Bray
Laura Huggins
Fedeal Reserve Bank of Dallas October 23, 2003 "You can't have a free society without private property." - Milton Friedman By Terry L. Anderson and Laura E. Huggins
PERC's Conference for Journalists Emigrant, Montana October 4, 2003 Friendly  Critique By David Roodman
Chapter 6 from The Technology of Property RightsBy Gregory B. Christainsen and Brian C. Gothberg
By Michael Crichton San Francisco September 15, 2003
Jane Shaw
In this article prepared for the Institute for Study of Economics and the Environment at Lindenwood University, Jane Shaw discusses how advocacy has replaced good science in many school textbooks, and how it can be changed.
President Bush had numerous chances to show that conservative principles include conservation, yet at midterm scores low grades for implementing the tenets of free market environmentalism, which emphasizes establishing incentives a
By James Pinkerton Excerpted from an article on Tech Central
One of four experts who offer differing opinions on environmental education.
One of four experts who offer differing opinions on environmental education.
One of four experts who offer differing views on environmental education.
One of four experts who offer differing views on environmental education.
Lone Mountain Coalition  
Terry Anderson, Jane Shaw
This essay explains how the well-accepted principles that explain market behavior and underlie prosperity also explain environmental problems and offer ways to solve them.
Richard Stroup
Executive Summary Podcast WAV 548 KBPodcast DVF 34 KB By Richard L. Stroup and Matthew Brown
Randy Simmons
President Clinton puts a stop to multiple use on national forests By Shannon Fitzsimmons
Richard Stroup, Jane Shaw
Conventional economic wisdom, in a theory first propounded by Nobel laureate Paul Samuelson, holds that the unregulated market cannot be expected to protect the environment.
Jonathan Adler Arlington, Virginia Ryan Amacher, Ph.D. Department of Economics University of Texas, Arlington
Terry Anderson
Global Researcher February 2008 By Terry L. Anderson
Donald Leal
Donald R. Leal and Vishwanie Majaraj
Terry Anderson, Laura Huggins
By Terry L. Anderson and Laura E. Huggins Special to the Hoover Digest
The article excerpt below is from the Cato Institute's
Terry Anderson, Dominic Parker
By Terry L. Anderson and Dominic P. Parker
Terry Anderson, Dominic Parker
By Terry L. Anderson and Dominic P. Parker
Robert Deacon, Dominic Parker
By Robert T. Deacon and Dominc P. Parker
Bruce Yandle
By Bruce Yandle and Stuart Buck
In the forty years that have passed since oily debris on the banks
Pierre Desrochers
By Pierre Desrochers and Hiroko Shimizu Executive Summary
Read more about Milton Friedman
PERC Research Director Don Leal has been appointed to serve on an advisor
Pierre Desrochers
By Pierre Desrochers and Hiroko Shimizu
Terry Anderson
On ABC's "20/20" with John Stossel, Terry Anderson sugests eating tigers could be the best way to save them.
PERC Executive Director Terry Anderson:
Peter Hill
Full Text of Speech: Morality and Capitalism
January 12, 2010 Public Lecture Strathmore Univeristy January 12, 2009
Randal O'Toole Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute
Agenda       Readings        Faculty
Matt Ridley
A 30th Anniversary Celebration ofPERC—Property and Environment Research Center
H. Spencer Banzhaf
Young scholars from various discipline challenge the PERC founders of free market environmentalism on what works, what could work in the future and how to address large scale problems such as climate change, and also when markets are not the so. They will also discuss situations where markets might not work best or might not work at all.
International donors provide funds to build recycling plants in the Ukraine, subsidizing an an inefficient and un sustainable economic activity.
Dog waste is powering a gas light with methane in a Cambridge, MA, dog park.
Linda Platts
By Lexi Feinberg
Charging steep fees to hunt endangered species may provide the funds necessary to save them. The black rhino is an example of a program the is being tried in Africa.
Randy Simmons
PERC Senior Fellow Randy Simmons and co-authors expand on the Bootleggers and Baptits theory of inefficient government regualtion by addding the political entrepeneur to the mix.
Terry Anderson, Gary Libecap
Where water markets are being allowed to work, prices reflect scarcity and trades provide incentives to conserve.
Holly Fretwell
At the annual meeting of the Society for Enviromental Journalists, PERC researcher Holly Fretwell suggested that the national parks would benefit most from earning their own funds from entrance fees rather than depending on politicians to hand over more tax dollars. Meanwhile, the parks continue to deteriorate.
As overfishing depletes marine resources and reduces incomes for fishermen, a new approach giving fishermen a share in their fishery is soving by an environmental and economic problem. Catch-share management with a strong local leader in charge is winning converts around the world.
Paul Schwennesen
Government subsidies, overregulation and the consolidation has significantly altered the meat industry, makingit less competitive, loaded wiht paperwork, difficult for small ranchers to survive.
Jonathan Fahey
A new drilling technology is opening up vast fields of previously out-of-reach oil in the western United States. This new drilling is expected to raise U.S. production by at least 20 percent over the next five years. And within 10 years, it could help reduce oil imports by more than half.
Holly Fretwell
To protect the bison in Yellowstoe from slaughter when they leave the park seeking winter forage, some private environmental group with an entrepreneurial plan should reward landovers who providing grazing room.
Terry Anderson, Dominic Parker
Until American Indians living on Reservations have secure property rights and a stable rule of law, they will remain isloated on islands of poverty in a sea of prosperity.
With streams and rivers drying up because of over-usage, Rob Harmon has implemented an ingenious market mechanism to bring back the waterand fFarmers and beer companies find they have mutual interests.
Terry Anderson
Terry Anderson presents the annual Friedrich Wieser lecture at the Prague Conference on Political Economy 2011 to supporters of the Austrian School of Economics and political economy of freedom.
Gary Libecap
By Gary D. Libecap
Andrew Morriss
Promises that green energy will change almost everypart of our lives for the better is an enchanting idea, but it is also a myth.
Agenda           Readings            Faculty   
Steven F. Hayward
By Steve Hayward
Paul Schwennesen
The revival of local food and local markets marches under the banner of the left, but its resistance to centralization also appeals to conservatives.
Kenya might make 20 times more money from the Masai Mara Game Reserve, which is just a sixth of Tanzania's Serengeti, but this, reports Special Correspondent WYCLIFFE MUGA, comes at a huge environmental cost .
Linda Platts
PERC Enviropreneur alum Dave Wager is helping to restore forests overstocked with trees and making a business by using the wood to make beautiful Tree Ring Pens.
Holly Fretwell
Jeff Laszlo knew that to keep the family ranch, he needed to chnage his operations. By recognizing the environmental assets on his ranch and forging partnerships with public and private funders he restored a huge wetland that now flourishes with fish, wilflife and plants. By investing in conservation, he has saved his ranch and increased his income.
MIT Professor Michael Greenstone says that humans will adapt to climate change, with wealthier nations faring better than poorer nations.
Jonathan Adler PERC Visiting Fellow
Jonathan H. Adler PEC Visiting Fellow
Reed Watson
By Reed Watson
The Endangered Species Act (ESA) was enacted in 1973 and today is viewed as the most powerful environmental law in the nation as well as one of the most controversial. "Decoupling" the listing decision how the species should be protected how it should be protected could allow more creative measures tailored the needs ad and circumstances of each species.
Jonathan Adler
Whether a given species is at risk of extinction may be a scientific question, but what to do about it is not. What conservation measures should be adopted to address such threats, and at what cost, are policy questions, says Jonathan Adler
Given property rights to the wild animals that often damage their crops or even kill them, Namibian farmers now are profiting from tourism and hunting, while poaching has virtually disappeared.
Traffic congestion is a huge problem, but building more roads only compounds the problem. University of Toronto Professor Matt Turner says studies show that mass transit also is not panacea. Perhaps it is time to try the market with congestion pricing.
Paul Schwennesen
The U.S. Department of Labor proposes sweeping new regulations to limit child labor. Not all agricultural work is inherently dangerous, and sweeping generalizations will do more harm than good.
Small, struggling, rural communities around the nation are struggling to meet tough EPA water quality standards that would cost them millions of dollars.
Brett Howell, a former PERC Enviropreneur, is exploring how to apply market-based approaches to making coral reef restoration financially sustainable.
Paul Schwennesen
By Paul Schwennesen
Shawn Regan
A former backcountry ranger, PERC research fellow Shawn Regan weighs in on the national parks' proposed entrance fee hikes. Fee revenues help parks address critical needs without relying on Congress for appropriations.
Randy Simmons
Allowing price to ration water may be a bitter political pill to swallow, but it makes economic and environmental sense. Writing at The Conversation, Randy Simmons lends insight into California's water crisis.
Terry Anderson
While the Endangered Species Act has led to habitat destruction, private solutions give us reason to be hopeful. In South Africa's Wildlife Ranching magazine, Terry Anderson explains how Texan ranchers brought the scimitar-horned oryx back from the brink of extinction.
Gary Libecap
In the Wall Street Journal, Gary Libecap and Robert Glennon discuss the West's outdated water laws. A policy overhaul, they argue, would allow efficient water markets and reward conservation.
Terry Anderson
In the Wall Street Journal, Terry Anderson examines how landowners have managed wildlife habitat under the ESA and suggests heavy-handed enforcement has discouraged private conservation efforts.
Terry Anderson
The boom in gun sales has created a revenue gusher for wildlife restoration.
Annie Ireland
PERC senior fellow Jonathan Adler testifies on state vs. federal environmental policy implementation.
Timothy Taylor
President Obama recently proposed a federal strategy to promote honey bee health. But an economic perspective may provide some lessons for the government task force.
Terry Anderson, Daniel Botkin
Good science combined with the right incentives will allow humans to live in harmony with ever-changing nature.
Terry Anderson
Unlike bureaucrats in Washington, entrepreneurs aren't just talking about the weather, they are doing something about it.
Terry Anderson, Carson Bruno
When it comes to hydraulic fracturing, market-based solutions are much more efficient and effective than top-down government regulations.
Terry Anderson
Today's Sagebrush rebels want federal lands transferred to states, while environmentalists want more federal control. Both sides should be careful what they ask for.
Shawn Regan
When environmental groups buy ranchers' permits, there's no need for the feds to start rustling up trouble.
Terry Anderson, Carson Bruno
According to scientific research, the environmental costs are real but rare.
Jonathan Adler, Nathaniel Stewart
Ending the tragedy of the oceans: How property rights can save the world's fisheries.
Roger Meiners
With central planners promising such extraordinary economic returns from regulation, what could possibly go wrong?
Shawn Regan
Imagine if the government were responsible for looking after your best interests. How well would this work? Just ask Native Americans.
Jonathan Adler
Many environmental problems are exaggerated. The threats facing marine fisheries, however, are quite real. There is a growing consensus among fishery experts that greater reliance on private-property rights can prevent overfishing and ensure sustainability.
Shawn Regan
The Farm Bill will make it more difficult for Asian catfish to enter the U.S. market. But critics say it’s a trade barrier in disguise.
Holly Fretwell
Citizens in the West have little say on how most of their land is managed. Some western states are beginning to fight for custody.
Holly Fretwell
In the West, nearly half the land is owned and controlled by the federal government, compared with only 4 percent in the East. Holly Fretwell explains why that difference affects the ability of western states to determine their own destiny.
Terry Anderson, Reed Watson
Montana's Stream Access Law has led to an erosion of property rights and reduced public benefits flowing from private lands. Isn’t it time to say enough is enough?
Shawn Regan
When industry and environmental groups claim that a regulation will solve all problems, consumers beware. It’s probably crony capitalism in disguise.
Laura Huggins
It is time to move beyond the Nixon approach to the environment. The past 40 years have shown how good political intentions — or, at least, political maneuvering — in the name of environmental protection can create perverse economic incentives to do the opposite.
Andrew Morriss
Congress should not waste time debating a comprehensive climate change legislation in the coming year.
Randy Simmons, Ryan M. Yonk
At the turn of the 20th century, Congress passed the Antiquities Act – giving President Teddy Roosevelt the authority to restrict the use of any federally owned public land by designating it as a national monument. However, monument designation can bring distinct negative impacts. Here's why.
Terry Anderson, Shawn Regan
In the Wall Street Journal, Terry Anderson and Shawn Regan explain how Washington rules prevent tribes from developing resources that could help lift them out of poverty.
Terry Anderson, Shawn Regan
Indian reservations are hobbled by burdensome regulations and bureaucracy. Native Americans should be given the dignity they deserve and be freed from federal guardianship.
Matthew Denhart
Our nation continues to pile precautionary energy policies onto a struggling economy, but we’re bumping into an inconvenient truth.
PERC and the George W. Bush Institute will host a conference on energy regulation on September 12, 2013 at the George W. Bush Center in Dallas, TX
Reed Watson
Despite their ecological and economic importance, Florida’s coral reefs are teetering on the verge of collapse. Writing in Sea Technology, Reed Watson explores a market-based restoration plan to save the reefs.
Shawn Regan
PERC research fellow Shawn Regan provides testimony for the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources hearing on "Funding the National Park System for the Next Century."
Roger Meiners, Andrew Morriss
Recent developments in domestic energy production have shifted the political debate about energy independence. Get the facts about energy independence.
Shawn Regan
On Atlantic Media's business news site, Quartz.com, research fellow Shawn Regan explores the resurgence of worry over colony collapse disorder.
Terry Anderson, Dominic Parker
As published in Oxford Journal's "Review of Environmental Economics and Policy," Terry Anderson and Nick Parker show that entrepreneurs guide the evolution of property rights, which in turn can lower the transaction costs of using markets to solve environmental problems.
Paul Schwennesen
The command-and-control viewpoint isn’t illogical. The American food supply is one of the safest in the world. But I submit that the current system fails to tap creative, market-based incentives to further improve food safety.
Gary Libecap
Some of our most beautiful and amazing species of fish are at risk for extinction. Here’s how we can save them.
Terry Anderson
As oil continues to gush from BP's Macondo well and politicians posture, it is time for us to ask why we are drilling in such risky places when there is oil available elsewhere. The answer lies in the mantra NIMBY—"not in my back yard."
Terry Anderson
The "Skywalk" project could help lift 2,100 tribal members out of poverty, but a legal dispute may have killed the goose that could lay golden eggs. Worse yet, this could stifle investment across Indian Country.
Terry Anderson, Reed Watson
Stream access is a confusing and controversial topic. PERC has waded into the stream access debate to provide a free market environmentalist perspective.
A splendid primer that covers a wide range of questions relating to drinking water including historical and ethical issues.
Shawn Regan
As America’s energy production reaches record levels, it's time for a new system of public land management that promotes cooperation instead of conflict.
PERC senior fellow Randy Simmons writing on the sequester as an exercise in the Washington Monument strategy.
By Brian Lutz and Martin Doyle -- Our research shows that for the Marcellus Shale significantly less wastewater is generated for every unit of natural gas recovered by hydraulic fracturing than by conventional gas production.
Andrew Morriss
For more than two decades, special interests have persuaded Congress to mandate Americans buy ethanol whether they want to or not. As a result, 40 percent of the U.S. corn crop is now used for ethanol rather than food.
Reed Watson, Brett Howell
Despite their ecological and economic importance, Florida’s coral reefs are teetering on the verge of collapse. Scientific studies point to the impact of effluent discharges from municipal storm and wastewater treatment facilities along the coast.
Laura Huggins
In June of 2012, the world mourned the loss of the giant tortoise, Lonesome George. The 100-year-old tortoise lived in the Galapagos and was believed to be the last of his sub-species. George served as an ambassador for endangered species—especially in Ecuador where many groups are working to restore not only tortoise populations throughout the archipelago but also to improve the status of other rare species.
Steven F. Hayward
Would the EPA be better run by a bipartisan commission? Reform the agency by politicizing it, says PERC board member Steven Hayward.
By Andrew C. Revkin5:02 p.m. | Updated below |
Terry Anderson
When the wildfires that are burning millions of acres in the West are finally smothered by winter snows, environmentalists undoubtedly will blame climate change. They might look in the mirror instead.
Reed Watson, Terry Anderson
In the Supreme Court of the State of MontanaSupreme Court Case No. 12-0312PUBLIC LANDS ACCESS ASSOCIATION, INC., Petitioner/Appellant,v.
PERC Senior Fellow Jonathan Adler writes a series of short blogs on The Atlantic website describing how property rights can help protect the environment.
Terry Anderson
Protecting the Aberdares ecosystem required keeping the local people from poaching the wildlife, grazing it with livestock, and cutting the indigenous trees for firewood.
Terry Anderson
The link between natural resources, institutions, and economic prosperity is nowhere more apparent than on American Indian reservations
Mike Higuera
One fellow at PERC's 2011 Enviropreneur Institute explored ways to create incentives for oil companies to work with conservation organizations like TNC to plan their projects to avoid sensitive areas and minimize impacts.
Paul Schwennesen
One of our nations greatest resources, its large western forests, is given over to the care of government. Polluted streams, destroyed homes, and wasted assets are the result, even though the responsibility was clearly in our realm. The solution is to allow the resource to be privately owned, not collectively
Shawn Regan
Why are ranchers and mineral companies allowed to bid on federal land leases, but the public cannot? If environmentalists could lease the land they want to conserve, taxpayers might see a higher return and also avoid some bitter disputes.
Terry Anderson, Shawn Regan
When people who live near wild elephants understand how they can benefit economically, they have an incentive to protect the wildlife.
Dominic Parker, Shawn Regan, Walter Thurman
PERC scholars compare the Conservation and Wetland Reserves, both federal programs, with two private land trusts,The Nature Conservancy and the Land Trust Alliance,to determine their influence on each other.
Fred Pearce
The West African nation of Liberia has partnered with the European Union in a unique attempt to protect its remaining forests by barcoding every harvestable tree.
In Montana, enviropreneurs like Chris Corbin are creating a water market by helping owners identify and vaule their water rights and sell them.
Shawn Regan
Originally published at Grist.
Holly Fretwell
Regulations requiring greater fuel efficiency in cars create unintended consequences such as more driving and more energy use because of the car's fuel efficiency.
James G. Workman
Who really owns water, the matrix of life, and how much water we can own, and should have the right and ability to save and trade water we don't use with others in our system for a price we voluntarily negotiate?
Bruce Yandle
PERC Senior Fellow Bruce Yandle orginated the theory of Bootleggers and Baptists in the early 1980s. In essence, two different groups suppor the same, regulations, but benefit from different effects of the regulation. Has anything changed?
Todd Gartner
Todd Gartner, a 2007 Enviropreneur Institute alum, describes how economic incentives can be used to connect forests, water, and communities. Working with the World Resources Institute he discusses his work on two pilot projects that are connecting the buyers of ecosystem services with the sellers of the services.
Paul Schwennesen
Paul Schwennesen an Enviropreneur-in-Residence at PERC and a former fellow at the Enviropreneur Institute is one of seven top winners in a global easy contest sponsored by the SEVEN Fund in Cambridge, MA. The topic was the "morality of profit."
Bruce Yandle
By Bruce Yandle Clemson University
By Katharine Herrup
Chris Corbin
At a young age Chris Corbin was told, "Do what you
Terry Anderson, Donald Leal
June & December 1988Volume 20