Water

James G. Workman
News-TribuneNovember 25, 2007
Brandon Scarborough
August 2007By Brandon Scarborough and Hertha Lund
Gary Libecap
By Gary Libecap
Jane Shaw
Herald and NewsKlamath Falls, ORJune 14, 2004 Water trades work elsewhere:Why not in the Basin? By Jane S. Shaw
With abundant rainfall, the southeastern United States has rarely experienced conflicts over the allocation of water. But that is changing. As population grows, the demand for water grows, and when periodic drought occurs, disputes can result.
Lea-Rachel Kosnik, Roger Meiners
"Restoring Harmony in the Klamath Basin" explains how this conflict developed and offers a solution—markets in water. Written by Roger Meiners and Lea-Rachel Kosnik, this paper persuasively argues that clarification of property rights to water is fundamental to ending the crisis.
A new series of books for young people offers objective and balanced discussions of controversial issues.
By Clay J, Landry To the Reader
Orange County RegisterJuly 18, 1999 CLAY LANDRYCopyright 1999 The Orange County Register
Bruce Yandle
Environmental Protection MagazineMarch 1999 Harnessing Markets to Improve Water Quality: Using a free-market approach can save
NWRA (National Water Resources Association): What is PERC’s mission and how are you included in groundwater marketing?
Terry Anderson
The Orange County RegisterFebruary 16, 1998 By Terry L. Anderson
Terry Anderson
Water MarketsPriming the Invisible PumpTerry L. Anderson and Pamela S. Snyder
Peter Hill, Terry Anderson
Water Marketing--The Next GenerationTerry L. Anderson and Peter J. Hill, Editors
Terry Anderson
Savannah Morning NewsMay 19, 1996 Georgia's Groundwater: Own It or Lose It By Terry L. Andersonand Pamela S. Snyder
Terry Anderson
More Books by PERC Authors and Editors:
Terry Anderson
More Books by PERC Authors and Editors:
Terry Anderson
More Books by PERC Authors and Editors:
Terry Anderson, Brandon Scarborough, Reed Watson
Authors Reed Watson and Brandon Scarborough briefly describe and give examples of how water markets can not only provide water where it is needed most, but avoid the acrimony of past water disputes.
Terry Anderson, Brandon Scarborough, Reed Watson
Terry Anderson
Global Researcher February 2008 By Terry L. Anderson
The article excerpt below is from the Cato Institute's
Q & A with author Robert GlennonIsland Press
At the PERC workshop, scholars presented papers examining why water markets have not developed further than they have and explored how institutional and political barriers might be lowered.
Terry Anderson, Gary Libecap
Where water markets are being allowed to work, prices reflect scarcity and trades provide incentives to conserve.
With streams and rivers drying up because of over-usage, Rob Harmon has implemented an ingenious market mechanism to bring back the waterand fFarmers and beer companies find they have mutual interests.
James G. Workman
Who really owns water, the matrix of life, and how much water we can own, and should have the right and ability to save and trade water we don’t use with others in our system for a price we voluntarily negotiate?
Holly Fretwell
Jeff Laszlo knew that to keep the family ranch, he needed to chnage his operations. By recognizing the environmental assets on his ranch and forging partnerships with public and private funders he restored a huge wetland that now flourishes with fish, wilflife and plants. By investing in conservation, he has saved his ranch and increased his income.
Small, struggling, rural communities around the nation are struggling to meet tough EPA water quality standards that would cost them millions of dollars.
Israelis and Palestinians are building peace through wastewater treatment.
Reed Watson, Peter Hill, Shawn Regan
Listen as Aaron Flint of "Voices of Montana" talks with Reed Watson, P.J. Hill, Shawn Regan, and Laura Huggins about free market environmentalism.
Reed Watson
February 12, 2014 -- Reed Watson on The Jason lewis Show discusses the need for water markets to solve California's acute water scarcity.
Reed Watson
With less than a foot of rainfall each year, the Mojave Desert is not an obvious place to look for water. Reed Watson explores an innovative proposal to pump groundwater from the Mojave and move it to nearby Southern California municipalities.
Reed Watson
In this case study, Reed Watson explores what the Scott River Water Trust is, how it works, and why others should be taking notice.
Reed Watson
Despite their ecological and economic importance, Florida’s coral reefs are teetering on the verge of collapse. Writing in Sea Technology, Reed Watson explores a market-based restoration plan to save the reefs.
Reed Watson, Greg Sauer
Roman Polanski’s 1974 classic Chinatown starring Jack Nicholson and Faye Dunaway demonized water transfers in Southern California as the scam de jure of corrupt politicians and greedy land speculators. Hollywood’s connection to reality is often a tenuous one, and Chinatown is no exception.
Terry Anderson
John Batchelor interviewed PERC president, Terry Anderson, on the upcoming stream access case in Montana.
Laura Huggins sat down recently with fly fishermen Miles Noles to discuss the upcoming Montana Supreme Court case on stream access. Huggins discusses PERC's position on stream access and her experience fishing Montana's rivers and streams.
Terry Anderson, Reed Watson
Stream access is a confusing and controversial topic. PERC has waded into the stream access debate to provide a free market environmentalist perspective.
PERC’s Executive Director, Dr. Dino Falaschetti, recently visited the George W. Bush Institute, where he sat down with Dr. Eric Bing to discuss how economic growth affects the environment.
A splendid primer that covers a wide range of questions relating to drinking water including historical and ethical issues.
Kate Fitzpatrick
Kate Fitzpatrick is a PERC enviropreneur and program manager at the Deschutes River Conservancy developing market-based strategies for water conservation.
Terry Anderson
Changes in the environment, population, and industry have created water scarcity in some areas. Terry L. Anderson the President of The Property and Environment Research Center and Gretchen W. McClain the CEO of Xylem discuss how society can meet these water challenges.
Reed Watson
When the Ancient Mariner observed “water, water everywhere, nor any drop to drink” he would have no intention of sharing a freshwater source, had he found one. Indeed, we are awash with water here on the Blue Planet, but only a small fraction is in the location, volume, and quality needed to satisfy our demands.
Reed Watson
This podcast provides a quick overview of ecosystem services and the potential for water markets - featuring Director of Applied Programs Reed Watson and PERC Enviropreneur Alum Jamie Workman. 
Outreach associate, David Currie talks with Alan Girard (Chesapeake Bay Foundation) and Joan Mulhern (Earth Justice) on the Marc Steiner Show. Together they consider the legacy of the Clean Water Act on its 40th anniversary.
Thursday marks the 40th anniversary of the Clean Water Act. No doubt, the billions spent on the act have improved overall water quality.
Reed Watson, Terry Anderson
In the Supreme Court of the State of MontanaSupreme Court Case No. 12-0312PUBLIC LANDS ACCESS ASSOCIATION, INC., Petitioner/Appellant,v.
James G. Workman
PERC Enviropreneur Institute Alum James Workman discusses the water-wildfire nexus and why we should save rivers and destroy trees.
Brandon Scarborough
World Oceans Day is meant to bring communities from around the globe together to celebrate the vast environmental, economic and social wealth of our oceans.
Terry Anderson
I'm in rainy Seattle to give a speech on the Green Tea Party at an environmental conference. Ads for the hotel boast that it has double shower heads, which had me pondering the following:
Brennan Jorgensen
When the washing machine is running, the sprinklers are on, and the kids are filling the bathtub, few Americans are thinking about how much water they are consuming.
Jonathan Adler
The regulators lost to the regulated yesterday in Sackett v. Environmental Protection Agency.
A lot has been written about PERC’s Enviropreneur Institute lately – and for good reason.
Jonathan Adler
At SCOTUSBlog, Lyle Denniston characterizes the oral argument in Sackett v.
Jonathan Adler
Today the Supreme Court hears oral argument in Sackett v. EPA, a challenge to the federal government’s claim that landowners (and other regulated entities) may not obtain pre-enforcement review of an administrative compliance order under the Clean Water Act.
Jonathan Adler
Last month, the X-Prize Foundation announced the winners of the Wendy Schmidt Oil Cleanup Challenge
Brandon Scarborough
The United Nations recently declared access to clean drinking water and sanitation a basic human right.
Shawn Regan
Lynne Kiesling at Knowledge Problem has an interesting post that might be of interest to enviropreneurs.
Terry Anderson
Last week I joined Andy Nash on InsideAcademia.tv for a short discussion on "Sus
Shawn Regan
PERC enviropreneur alum Chris Corbin is featured at New West today for his water market consulting work with
In Montana, enviropreneurs like Chris Corbin are creating a water market by helping owners identify and vaule their water rights and sell them.
Shawn Regan
Cross-posted at Grist.A recent post on Grist attempted to dismantle the intellectual foundations of free market environmentalism—the application of markets and property rights to solve environmental problems. But far from toppling a burgeoning movement within modern environmentalism, it succeeded only in misrepresenting the subject.To recap: Clark Williams-Derry claimed that while free market environmentalism may be effective in some areas of the environment (e.g., fisheries management), its reliance upon unrealistic assumptions about the real world largely relegates it to useless intellectual theorizing. In particular, the Coase theorem—an important component of market-based environmentalism named for Nobel Prize-winning economist Ronald Coase—amounts to “a quirky but not particularly relevant bit of theoretical math.”While there is certainly much more to free market environmentalism than the work of Coase (see Terry Anderson and Donald Leal’s book Free Market Environmentalism for more details), I focus here mostly on the misinformed critique of Coase that has been used to discredit free market environmentalism.So, who is Coase, what is his theorem, and what does it have to do with free market environmentalism?
Reed Watson
by Reed Watson
Todd Gartner
Todd Gartner, a 2007 Enviropreneur Institute alum, describes how economic incentives can be used to connect forests, water, and communities. Working with the World Resources Institute he discusses his work on two pilot projects that are connecting the buyers of ecosystem services with the sellers of the services.
Terry Anderson
Today, the great economist and Nobel laureate Ronald Coase will celebrate his 100th birthday. Coase’s work has revolutionized the way economists view resource conflicts.
In the fall edition of PERC Reports out this week, James Salzman, professor of law and environmental policy at Duke University, provides an overview of ecosys
Terry Anderson
In 1962, Congressman Wayne Aspinall wrote to President Kennedy asking him to establish a commission to review public land laws.
Brandon Scarborough, Reed Watson
Using a market based approach, urban areas in Colorado can buy water consumption rights from ranchers. This water banking approach is a cost-effective means to water conservation.
Brandon Scarborough, Reed Watson
In drought plagued southwestern Georgia, conservation groups paid farmers to save water for streams by employing more efficient irrigation and wireless technology to measure soil moisture.
Brandon Scarborough, Reed Watson
The Habitat Farming Enterprise Program may be able to restore three endangered and threatened fish species to the Columbia River where millions of dollars from government agencies and conservation groups have failed.
Brandon Scarborough
Water rights have evolved in recent years as parties express desires to sell, lease, or give water for environmental or recreational purposes.
Discussion Draft for Workshop “Water Markets: Why Not More?” Property and Environment Research Center Bozeman, Montana September 2009
Chris Corbin
At a young age Chris Corbin was told, "Do what you
Gary Libecap
In the early twentieth century, L.A. purchased water rights by buying up farmland and conveying the water back to L.A. These purchases created a legacy of distrust and suspicion, as people began to view the trades as theft. Gary Libecap takes a second look at the L.A.-Owens Valley transfers.

Opinions

James G. Workman
By Helen M. Poulos and James G. Workman

Features

Brandon Scarborough
Water marketing for environmental flows gains momentum
Jane Shaw
Experience with water leasing reaps success stories for TU
Chesapeake Bay orthodoxy needs a reality check
Partnerships benefit Northwest Fisheries
If you can't dam, divert, or drill, it's time to consider allocating water through markets.
Carol Ferrie
By Carol Ferrie
Jane Shaw
By Jane S. Shaw
Wisconsin leads the way in deconstructing dams that obstruct its many rivers.
Tom Iseman
By Tom Iseman
Chris Corbin
An enviropreneur uses water rights markets to keep water instream
Kelly L. Westover
By Kelly L. Westover
David Figura
Doug Barclay vividly remembers a fall day in the early 1980s when he said upwards of 3,000 people were on his New York property along the lower Salmon River
Reed Watson
Protecting private property rights is critical to protecting environmental resources because private landowners respond to incentives.
James Huffman
Public access to rivers, lakes, and streams seems like a good idea in the abstract. Why not allow access to anyone who wants to enjoy the recreational opportunities associated with water?
Bruce Yandle
In the late 1990s, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) began encouraging the use of market forces to improve water quality in rivers, streams, and coastal waters.

Columns

Terry Anderson
ON TARGET Fightin' or Drinkin' By Terry Anderson PERC Reports, June 2007
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin
Daniel Benjamin
Waterborne diseases are responsible for 20 percent of deaths in children under the age of five. Microbes such as E. coli found in fecal matter cause diarrhea that kills by dehydrating its victims.
Terry Anderson
When the battles over water in Oregon’s Klamath River Basin were at their peak, PERC organized a meeting in Portland to bring competing parties to the table in search of common ground for reducing the conflict.

Perspectives

Holly Fretwell
Living in the Korogocho slum, a small settlement on the outskirts of Nairobi, Kenya, is not easy. Think crowds, no running water or sanitation, minimal electricity, and widespread crime. Furthermore, property rights are limited, at best, and most goods and income are amassed in the underground marketplace.
Linda Platts
In the basement of an engineering building at Northeastern University in Boston, a strange eggbeater-type machine is strapped to a gurney in the corner.
Linda Platts
A new technology could make use of excess heat and at the same time produce millions of gallons of fresh water from power plants. The novel idea originated with two professors at the University of Florida, James Klausner and Renwei Mei.
Letter to the Editor, From Ben F. Vaughan IV.
Linda Platts
More than sixty miles from the nearest ocean, Pacific white shrimp are growing plump and juicy in pure fresh water from deep artesian wells. They have been certified by the U.S.
Linda Platts
In Wyoming's Powder River Basin, efforts to access a major new source of natural gas stalled when drilling for coalbed methane also produced millions of gallons of tainted groundwater.
Linda Platts
Researchers at Purdue University say that water hazards on golf courses can do a lot more than provide a challenge to players. They can remove a host of pollutants and improve water quality.
Linda Platts
The pop cans, plastic cups, cellophane wrappers,
Linda Platts
Salt deposits can destroy farm land, but at long last, o
Linda Platts
By Linda Platts
Linda Platts
Swiss company donates water purification systems in Kenya earns carbon credits in return, and makes a profit.
Andrew Wilson
To keep the water running in LasVegas, recognize scarcity and let water rates rise-- double or even triple. Encourage homeowners to trade water rights. Let the market determine how much water people use, not the water police.
Linda Platts
An ancient technology to purify water meets modern water needs.
G. Tracy Mehan III
This classic of conservation literature is still illuminating important lessons today.
La Monica Everett-Haynes
The United States must come to terms with its lavish use of water and, at the same time, figure out serious solutions to the immediate problem related to access to water.
I’m torn. Some of my fondest Montana memories come from days of fly-fishing publicly accessed streams. In contrast, I’ve also conducted redd counts on one of the state’s most highly contested “stream access” streams and witnessed first-hand the natural resource benefits of privatization.
Randy Simmons
Anglers are doing back flips over a recent Utah Supreme Court Decision that makes public all waters in the state and permits recreationists to use streams that cross private property.