Property Rights

Randy Simmons
The public trust doctrine is a little-known bit of legal history that is now touted as an ancient rule of law that allows governments to control property long presumed to be privately owned.
Chip Mellor
Audio - Chip Mellor(Use Explorer for best results)
Peter Hill
By Peter J. Hill
Environmental ForumJanuary/February 2005Minister of Change
Terry Anderson
Case Western Reserve Law Review Fall 2004 Vol. 55:1By Terry L. Anderson
Terry Anderson
Rocky Mountain NewsJuly 3, 2004 By Terry L. Anderson
Terry Anderson, Peter Hill
 By Terry L. Anderson and Peter J. Hill
Bruce Yandle
RS-02-1a Update:  2004Bruce Yandle, Madhusudan Bhattarai, and Maya Vijayaraghavan
Terry Anderson
Terry L. Anderson, editor
Laura Huggins
Fedeal Reserve Bank of Dallas October 23, 2003 "You can't have a free society without private property." - Milton Friedman By Terry L. Anderson and Laura E. Huggins
Terry Anderson
Edited by Terry L. Anderson and Fred S. McChesney
Bruce Yandle
RS-02-2:  2002
Donald Leal
vThe OregonianJune 25, 2002 Individual Fishing Quotas:Long Overdue By Donald R. Leal
Donald Leal
A Summary
Peter Hill, Terry Anderson
Terry L. Anderson and Peter J. Hill Editors
Roger Meiners, Andrew Morriss
Two PERC researchers, reviewing the history of the banned pesticide DDT, have concluded that violation of private property rights lies at the heart of the conflict over DDT.
Lone Mountain Coalition  
Jane Shaw
By Jane S. Shaw To the Reader
J. Bishop Grewell
By J. Bishop Grewell To the Reader
Donald Leal
Overfishing in the oceans is a classic example of the "tragedy of the commons"-- overexploitation of an unowned resource. Fishing in U.S. waters is no longer a commons free of fishing restrictions, yet many fisheries still suffer from the tragedy of the commons.
Richard Stroup
Executive Summary Podcast WAV 548 KBPodcast DVF 34 KB By Richard L. Stroup and Matthew Brown
Jane Shaw
A new paper challenges conventional wisdom about the role of business in environmental issues. Written primarily for business executives, it offers new ideas for addressing environmental challenges while keeping a principled commitment to market competition, consumer choice, and innovation.
Jane Shaw
Tacoma News TribuneAugust 13, 1998 By Matthew Brown and Jane S. Shaw
Peter Hill, Roger Meiners
 Peter J. Hill and Roger E. Meiners, Editors
Linda Platts
Christian Science MonitorMarch 20, 1996 By Urs P. Kreuter and Linda E. Platts
Terry Anderson, Peter Hill
The Privatization Process:A Worldwide PerspectiveTerry L. Anderson and Peter J. Hill, Editors
Peter Hill, Terry Anderson
Terry L. Anderson and Peter J. Hill, Editors
Terry Anderson
Sovereign Nations or Reservations?An Economic History of American IndiansBy Terry L. Anderson
Terry Anderson, Peter Hill
Terry L. Anderson and Peter J. Hill, Editors
Terry Anderson, Randy Simmons
The Political Economy of Customs and Culture:Informal Solutions to the Commons ProblemsTerry L. Anderson and Randy T. Simmons, Editors
Terry Anderson
Terry L. Anderson Editor
Terry Anderson, Laura Huggins
By Terry L. Anderson and Laura E. Huggins
Randal O'Toole Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute
Private landowners with river and streams running through their property claim that stretch of water as their own, but rafters who float by claim the water belongs to the public.
Steven F. Hayward
By Steve Hayward
The evolution of property law in early America
PERC Senior Fellow Jonathan Adler writes a series of short blogs on The Atlantic website describing how property rights cant help protect the environment.
Terry Anderson
Long before the EPA was a glint in anyone's eye, property rights were dealing with pollution issues. Watch as PERC's Terry Anderson discusses free market solutions to pollution and other environmental conflicts with John Stossel on Fox Business Network.
Terry Anderson
In this issue of Capital Ideas -- Live!, Hayes Brown interviews Terry Anderson about free market environmentalism, how conservation benefits can flow from private land stewardship, and more.
Terry Anderson
Terry Anderson joins Russ Roberts for an EconTalk podcast about free-market environmentalism, the dynamics of the Yellowstone ecosystem, and how property rights can protect natural resources.
Timothy Taylor
President Obama recently proposed a federal strategy to promote honey bee health. But an economic perspective may provide some lessons for the government task force.
Reed Watson
Trampling the property rights of beachfront landowners in the name of public access is no way to encourage beach conservation.
Peter Hill
Watch PJ Hill discuss the economic history of the Oregon Trail and then join him LIVE this Thursday, June 26 from 6 - 8 pm mountain time to learn more, challenge his perspective, and discover the secret antidote to typhoid.
Terry Anderson, Gary Libecap
Environmental Markets is the inaugural book in Cambridge Studies in Economics, Choice, and Society, a new interdisciplinary series of theoretical and empirical research focusing on individual choice, institutions, and social outcomes.
Shawn Regan
Cliven Bundy's battle was born out of a broken system that encourages conflict, not negotiation.
Terry Anderson, Carson Bruno
When it comes to hydraulic fracturing, market-based solutions are much more efficient and effective than top-down government regulations.
Terry Anderson
Today's Sagebrush rebels want federal lands transferred to states, while environmentalists want more federal control. Both sides should be careful what they ask for.
Shawn Regan
When environmental groups buy ranchers' permits, there's no need for the feds to start rustling up trouble.
Reed Watson, Peter Hill, Shawn Regan, Laura Huggins
Listen as Aaron Flint of "Voices of Montana" talks with Reed Watson, P.J. Hill, Shawn Regan, and Laura Huggins about free market environmentalism.
Terry Anderson, Reed Watson
Montana's Stream Access Law has led to an erosion of property rights and reduced public benefits flowing from private lands. Isn’t it time to say enough is enough?
Te Maire Tau, a member of the Māori in New Zealand, discusses how their tribe is fighting to reinstate indigenous rights to own property and build an economy.
Reed Watson
The next time you fly in or out of Bozeman, Montana, remember Ronald Coase and his wisdom about markets as problem solvers.
Matt Ridley
The death this week of Ronald Coase, one of the world's most-cited economists, comes at a time when there is lively debate about the very issue he raised: why neither markets nor government are panaceas.
Terry Anderson
John Batchelor interviewed PERC president, Terry Anderson, on the upcoming stream access case in Montana.
Terry Anderson
The "Skywalk" project could help lift 2,100 tribal members out of poverty, but a legal dispute may have killed the goose that could lay golden eggs. Worse yet, this could stifle investment across Indian Country.
Terry Anderson
Private ownership is the key to good resource stewardship. As Terry Anderson explains, stream access laws undermine property rights and reduce landowners' incentives to provide habitat for fish and wildlife.
Daniel Benjamin
A reflection on the life of "one of the most important economists of the 20th century."
Jonathan Adler
Today the Supreme Court will hear oral argument in a potentially important takings case, Koontz v. St. Johns River Water Management District.
Reed Watson, Brett Howell
Despite their ecological and economic importance, Florida’s coral reefs are teetering on the verge of collapse. Scientific studies point to the impact of effluent discharges from municipal storm and wastewater treatment facilities along the coast.
Terry Anderson
Terry Anderson discusses how private property rights could improve reservation economies on "Voices of Montana" with Aaron Flint.
Holly Fretwell
Since 2005, 42 states have adjusted their eminent domain laws to better protect private property rights. How does your state's eminent domain law stack up?
Reed Watson, Terry Anderson
In the Supreme Court of the State of MontanaSupreme Court Case No. 12-0312PUBLIC LANDS ACCESS ASSOCIATION, INC., Petitioner/Appellant,v.
Peter Hill
PJ Hill talks about his book, “ The Not So Wild, Wild West,” with John Batchelor. He describes how the West was developed and how property rights emerged before governments.
Mark Sherman
Supreme Court gives private property owners the right to challenge EPA rulings that affect the use of their property.
Fred Pearce
The long-held contention that rural forest communities are the prime culprits in tropical forest destruction is increasingly being discredited, as evidence mounts that the best way to protect rainforests is to involve local residents in sustainable management.
Bruce Yandle
By Bruce Yandle Clemson University

Features

Elizabeth Singleton
By Elizabeth Singleton
Unfair outcomes for Kenya's Maasai.
What role for property rights?
How property rights save wildlife in Zimbabwe.
Terry Anderson
Hunting and economics meet in South Africa.
Sam Nugent
Regenerating coastal mangrove forests depends on recognizing the property rights of local people.
Roger Meiners, Andrew Morriss
Rachel Carson didn't start it; the U.S. government did.
Jane Shaw
By Matthew Brown and Jane S. Shaw
Jane Shaw
By Jane S. Shaw
Richard Wright
A First Nation in British Columbia in rewriting the rules.
Chief Shane Gottfriedson
First Nations are fighting for the same property rights that all Canadians enjoy
Te Maire Tau
Reinstating indigenous rights to own property and build an economy in New Zealand
Peter Hill
The basic idea was that bottom up, rather than top down, development of property rights, offered a useful tool for analyzing many resource issues.
What's your opinion on stream access? In the West, private landowners often provide much of the natural resource management at their own expense, which in turn benefits the public with healthy fisheries and prolific game.
Reed Watson
Protecting private property rights is critical to protecting environmental resources because private landowners respond to incentives.
Brandeth family protects nearly 30,000 acres for 157 years

Columns

Terry Anderson
The backlash from the Supreme Court's Kelo decision could relax land-use regulation around the country. And well it should.
Daniel Benjamin
Economic evidence reveals that property rights are more critical for prosperity than an efficient method of settling contractual disputes.
Terry Anderson
By Terry L. Anderson
Daniel Benjamin
A market approach to conservation: Buy land.
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin Given the racket that people raise over airport noise, one would think that the social benefits of  regulating airport noise must be great.
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin Insecure property rights induce trespassers and forest owners to cut tress on short rotations and not to replant.
Reed Watson
Preserving Property Rights in Iowa
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin
Daniel Benjamin
Property rights are essential for market exchange. The definition of those rights, their enforcement, and their transferability all help determine the extent of trade and the rate of economic development and wealth creation.
Daniel Benjamin
Economist, n. a scoundrel whose faulty vision sees things as they really are, not as they ought to be. —after Ambrose Bierce
Daniel Benjamin
In open-access settings, high-quality resources are lucrative; yet keeping out potential entrants may be extremely costly.
Daniel Benjamin
Secure property rights are central to economic prosperity. It was the emergence of secure property rights that laid the foundation for the Industrial Revolution and the subsequent explosion of per capita incomes.
Terry Anderson
Economists devote page upon page of their textbooks to discussions of “public goods,” arguing that markets won’t supply them.

Perspectives

Reed Watson
This fall, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear Stop the Beach Renourishment v. Florida Department of Environmental Protection, a case that raises the question of when, if ever, a judicial decision constitutes a taking of private property.
I’m torn. Some of my fondest Montana memories come from days of fly-fishing publicly accessed streams. In contrast, I’ve also conducted redd counts on one of the state’s most highly contested “stream access” streams and witnessed first-hand the natural resource benefits of privatization.
Jonathan Adler
Property rights advocates have long argued that the Endangered Species Act (ESA) effectively forces a handful of property owners to provide the “public good” of species habitat at private expense.
Chip Mellor
The St. Paul Port Authority is pursuing a scheme that could gut Minnesota’s popular 2006 comprehensive eminent domain reforms that protect homes, small businesses, and farms from government takings for private gain.
Randy Simmons
Anglers are doing back flips over a recent Utah Supreme Court Decision that makes public all waters in the state and permits recreationists to use streams that cross private property.
Reed Watson
On July 18, Kevin Conatser became the poster child for trespassing fishermen everywhere. He earned that reputation when the Utah Supreme Court ruled that public ownership of state waters gave him—and every other Utah resident—the right to stand, wade, and fish on the privately owned stream beds beneath those waters.