Government

Jane Shaw
Rocky Mountain News July 9, 2005 By C. Kenneth Orski and Jane S. Shaw
Randy Simmons
Headwaters NewsJanuary 5, 2005  By Randy T. Simmons
Land Letter October 28, 2004 By Allison A. Freeman Land Letter reporter
Forbes.com September 20, 2004 By Vernon L. Smith
Terry Anderson, Peter Hill
 By Terry L. Anderson and Peter J. Hill
Terry Anderson
Terry L. Anderson, editor
Richard Stroup
Richard L. Stroup
Lea-Rachel Kosnik, Roger Meiners
"Restoring Harmony in the Klamath Basin" explains how this conflict developed and offers a solution—markets in water. Written by Roger Meiners and Lea-Rachel Kosnik, this paper persuasively argues that clarification of property rights to water is fundamental to ending the crisis.
Andrew Morriss, Bruce Yandle, Lea-Rachel Kosnik
This paper discusses a new form of regulation. Rather than issuing rules, some government agencies, including the Environmental Protection Agency, have started to file lawsuits.
Andrew Morriss, Bruce Yandle
RS-02-3:  2002By Bruce Yandle, Andrew P. Morriss, and Lea-Rachel Kosnik
Roger Meiners
Read Chapter 9:All Play and No Pay: The Adverse Effects of Welfare Recreation
Author Seth Norton shows that the impacts of rapid population growth are not as severe as most people believe. Even more important, he shows how changes in a country's legal system and economic framework can overcome the problems caused by population growth.
RS-01-1:  2001By Stuart Buck and David Gerard
 By Allen K. Fitzsimmons
Donald Leal
A Summary
Terry Anderson, Bruce Yandle
Edited by Terry L. Anderson and Bruce Yandle
Roger Meiners, Andrew Morriss
Two PERC researchers, reviewing the history of the banned pesticide DDT, have concluded that violation of private property rights lies at the heart of the conflict over DDT.
Terry Anderson, J. Bishop Grewell
Bringing environmental issues into foreign policy-making and international law endangers trade, national sovereignty, and, ironically, long-term environmental improvement, according to two associates of the Political Economy Research Center (PERC).
By Dean LueckComplete Research Study PDF
June 21, 2000Testimony to the Subcommittee on Fisheries, Wildlife, and WaterBy David Gerard PERC Research Associate
It's time to let federal agencies buy and sell land, says Tim Fitzgerald in a new PERC Policy Series paper. "Federal Land Exchanges: Let's End the Barter" offers a practical way to reform the costly and time-wasting federal land exchange process.
Terry Anderson
Terry L. Anderson, Editor
Terry Anderson
Terry L. Anderson and Henry I. Miller, M.D. Editors
Jonathan Adler Arlington, Virginia Ryan Amacher, Ph.D. Department of Economics University of Texas, Arlington
Richard Stroup
Orange County RegisterOctober 12, 1999Fear Bigger Governments,Not Bigger Populations By Richard L. Stroup and Matthew Brown
Holly Fretwell
A Summary Private land trusts are proliferating around the nation as ways of preserving environmental values. So why not a federal land trust to manage the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in southern Utah?
Bruce Yandle
The Market Meets the EnvironmentEconomic Analysis of Environmental PolicyBruce Yandle Editor
The 1872 Mining Law, which governs the transfer of rights to mine gold, silver, copper, uranium and other hardrock minerals from federal lands, is the subject of continuing and sometimes rancorous controversy.
Terry Anderson
Terry L. Anderson, Editor
Peter Hill, Terry Anderson
Water Marketing--The Next GenerationTerry L. Anderson and Peter J. Hill, Editors
Peter Hill, Terry Anderson
Terry L. Anderson and Peter J. Hill, Editors
Once considered America's "crown jewels," our national parks have become tarnished by monetary problems. Campgrounds are closed, buildings are in disrepair, roads are potholed and natural resources are degraded.
Richard Stroup
The Washington TimesApril 2, 1996 By Richard Stroup
Robert Nelson
Public Lands and Private Rights:The Failure of Scientific ManagementBy Robert H. Nelson
Donald Leal
The Forest Service needs strong incentives to adhere to the bottom line. The right motivation could help create a profitable timber program.
Terry Anderson
Sovereign Nations or Reservations?An Economic History of American IndiansBy Terry L. Anderson
Terry Anderson
Terry L. Anderson, Editor
Terry Anderson, Peter Hill
Terry L. Anderson and Peter J. Hill, Editors
More Books by PERC Authors and Editors:
Bruce Yandle, Roger Meiners
Roger Meiners and Bruce Yandle, Editors
More Books by PERC Authors and Editors:
Terry Anderson
More Books by PERC Authors and Editors:
Richard Stroup
More Books by PERC Authors and Editors:
Terry Anderson, Laura Huggins
Edited by Terry L. Anderson, Laura E. Huggins, and Thomas Michael Power
Terry Anderson
Terry Anderson took on the Department of Interior during a Fox News segement called "Cabinet Wrecking Ball." Appearng Friday, March 19 on Scoreboard with David Asman, Terry says that the Department of Interior holds billions of dollars in assets in our national
By Marty Trillhaase
A PERC Workshop with scholars presenting papers on on land use conflicts in the West and raising questions about the governing institutions.
California is criminalizing recreational behavior in the state parks, writing tickets for the likes of rafting wihtout a life jacket and a dip without a suit. The fines they collect help fill the state coffers.
Roger Meiners
Stimulus spending for green jobs is short sighted. The solar panels produced can make electricty for less, but will eventually cost more to replace.
Paul Schwennesen
Government subsidies, overregulation and the consolidation has significantly altered the meat industry, makingit less competitive, loaded wiht paperwork, difficult for small ranchers to survive.
Terry Anderson
Pipelines in the U.S. carry 25 times more oil than tank cars do, yet derailments are by far the biggest threat.
Terry Anderson
Thursday, May 1, 2014 -- Terry Anderson joins John Batchelor on the John Batchelor Show to discuss the resurgence of the Sagebrush Rebellion of the 1970s.
Shawn Regan
When environmental groups buy ranchers' permits, there's no need for the feds to start rustling up trouble.
Reed Watson, Peter Hill, Shawn Regan, Laura Huggins
Listen as Aaron Flint of "Voices of Montana" talks with Reed Watson, P.J. Hill, Shawn Regan, and Laura Huggins about free market environmentalism.
Shawn Regan
Imagine if the government were responsible for looking after your best interests. How well would this work? Just ask Native Americans.
Michael `t Sas-Rolfes
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is about to destroy 6 tons of confiscated ivory. But does the destruction of ivory stockpiles really help the cause?
Jonathan Adler
Bryan Preston reports that the federal government is ordering private contractors to close campgrounds and the like on federal lands even where
Matt Ridley
The death this week of Ronald Coase, one of the world's most-cited economists, comes at a time when there is lively debate about the very issue he raised: why neither markets nor government are panaceas.
Shawn Regan
As PERC’s Rick Stroup often says, “Efficiency has no constituency,” and that’s certainly true of environmental policy. The federal government is replete with inefficiencies resulting from overlapping, redundant, and wasteful spending programs.
PERC senior fellow Randy Simmons writing on the sequester as an exercise in the Washington Monument strategy.
Bruce Yandle
The rise of national markets associated with national TV networks led to the expansion of federal social regulation and a simultaneous decline of federal economic regulation.
The authors explore the history of eminent domain in the United States—a history characterized by periodic public backlash.

Features

At a time when there’s a spotlight on America’s richest 1%, a look at the country’s 310 Indian reservations—where many of America’s poorest 1% live—can be more enlightening.
David Haddock
Legislators' investments threaten people living near the Atchafayala River
Richard Stroup
The freedom fighter's legacy lives on
By Brijesh Nalinakumari & Richard MacLean
Jane Shaw
By C. Kenneth Orski and Jane S. Shaw
This discussion is an edited version
Jane Shaw, Bruce Yandle
By Jane S. Shaw and Bruce Yandle With his 2006 budget, President Bush appears to be championing fiscal responsibility. For environmental policy, this change offers hope for new directions.
Randy Simmons
By Randy T. Simmons
G. Tracy Mehan III
Thatcher's environmental views, in retrospect.
The shadowy "precautionary principle" is stopping progress and distorting priorities.
he vision guiding its actions is poorly understood.
Daniel Benjamin
Eight great myths about waste disposal still abound. This article refutes them.
A portfolio of ideas for forward-looking regulators.
By Randall G. Holcombe  
Roger Meiners, Bruce Yandle
By Roger E. Meiners and Bruce Yandle
Sarah Anderson
Matching the size of government to the size of the problem
Roger Meiners, Andrew Morriss
An aggressive push for a green economy is underway in the United States. Policymakers routinely assert that “green jobs” can simultaneously improve environmental quality and reduce unemployment.

Columns

Daniel Benjamin
Do single-issue voters matter? Recent evidence suggests that, when the issue is the environment, the answer is “yes.”
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin
Daniel Benjamin
A scholarly article supports Environmental Protection Agency regulation of air pollutants.
Daniel Benjamin
A study of Wyoming oil drilling reveals that regulatory costs are higher on federal land.
Daniel Benjamin
A major study of the Clean Air Act confirms that -- as businesses often claim -- the costs are high.
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin Government-sponsored polar expeditions made fewer major discoveries introduced fewer innovations, lost more ships, and had more explorers die.
Daniel Benjamin
Politics, Costs, And Species
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin Given the racket that people raise over airport noise, one would think that the social benefits of  regulating airport noise must be great.
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin EPA cleanups of superfund sites cost an average of $12 billion for every cancer case prevented.
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin Now we know what a decade of quotas on Japanese cars cost consumers.
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin Late 19th-century storm warnings from the U.S. Weather Service yielded substantial, positive net returns to society.
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin People are knowledgeable about the hazards faced by individuals in their age group.
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin More than half of the increased market share of light trucks stems from government regulation.
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin Insecure property rights induce trespassers and forest owners to cut tress on short rotations and not to replant.
Daniel Benjamin
By Daniel K. Benjamin
Terry Anderson
Restoring Indian Dignity
Terry Anderson
Of course, President Obama is “green.” These days, it’s hard to find anyone or anything that isn’t. Barack and Michelle have their organic White House garden. George “dubya” has solar panels at his ranch.

Perspectives

Roger Meiners
A review of "Simpler: The Future of Government," by Cass Sunstein.
A proponent of wind power takes on Thomas Tanton's article from December, and Tanton replies.
Reed Watson
If you sue a federal agency and win, the US government will cover your attorney's fees and other litigation expenses.
Roger Meiners
The greatest environmental presiden