Environmental Education

Holly Fretwell
By Holly L. Fretwell Read the IntroductionRead a chapter
Jane Shaw
A new series of books for young people offers objective and balanced discussions of controversial issues.
Linda Platts
A new series of books for young people offers objective and balanced discussions of controversial issues.
Jane Shaw
In this article prepared for the Institute for Study of Economics and the Environment at Lindenwood University, Jane Shaw discusses how advocacy has replaced good science in many school textbooks, and how it can be changed.
Using economic reasoning, students solve seven mysteries surrounding the tragic reductions in fish populations.
Jane Shaw
A new series of books for young people offers objective and balanced discussions of controversial issues.
A new series of books for young people offers objective and balanced discussions of controversial issues.
Randy Simmons
A new series of books for young people offers objective and balanced discussions of controversial issues.
J. Bishop Grewell
PERC has created a syllabus to aid the inclusion of free market environmental ideas in to traditional environmental economics and policy curricula.
These nine lessons address controversial environmental topics within the agricultural sector and help students understand the incentives facing agricultural decision makers.
One of four experts who offer differing opinions on environmental education.
One of four experts who offer differing opinions on environmental education.
One of four experts who offer differing views on environmental education.
One of four experts who offer differing views on environmental education.
Terry Anderson, Jane Shaw
This essay explains how the well-accepted principles that explain market behavior and underlie prosperity also explain environmental problems and offer ways to solve them.
Economics and the Environment: EcoDetectives is a 15-lesson curriculum designed to show how teachers and students can use economic reasoning in efforts to describe and explain environmental problems.
Jane Shaw
This book provides parents and teachers with accurate and balanced information on environmental issues.
Jane Shaw
Wall Street JournalSeptember 4, 1996 By Michael Sanera and Jane S. Shaw
This newsletter for students is designed to help them think clearly as they form their opinions about environmental issues.
Andrew Morriss, Fr. Michael Butler
Policy recommendations from theologians and Church authorities have taken the form of pontifications, obscuring many economic and public policy realities. Butler and Morriss offer a new contribution to Orthodox environmental theology by Church teaching but also by sound economic analysis.
Roger Meiners, Pierre Desrochers, Andrew Morriss
Widely credited with launching the modern environmental movement when published 50 years ago, Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring had a profound impact on our society. As an iconic work, the book has often been shielded from critical inquiry, but this landmark anniversary provides an excellent opportunity to reassess its legacy and influence. In Silent Spring at 50: The False Crises of Rachel Carson a team of national experts explores the book’s historical context, the science it was built on, and the policy consequences of its core ideas. The conclusion makes it abundantly clear that the legacy of Silent Spring is highly problematic. While the book provided some clear benefits, a number of Carson’s major arguments rested on what can only be described as deliberate ignorance. Despite her reputation as a careful writer widely praised for building her arguments on science and facts, Carson’s best-seller contained significant errors and sins of omission. Much of what was presented as certainty then was slanted, and today we know much of it is simply wrong.
After two weeks of workshops, mentoring sessions, and networking, this year's 14 enviropreneurs head home to implement the innovative market-based conservation strategies they explored at PERC's 2
Holly Fretwell
A curious model for conservation is taking the stage. It is grounded in protecting landscapes and species but adds humans to the mix. Though not a new idea, it is often dismissed, even discouraged, by environmental thinkers.
Laura Huggins
Publishers Weekly recommends The Locavore's Dilemma: In Praise of the 10,000 Mile Diet, co-authored by former PERC fellows Pierre Desrochers and Hiroko Shimizu, as a book to watch for in 2012.
Laura Huggins
The scimitar horned oryx, the addax, the dama gazelle – endangered animals one would expect to encounter in Africa. Yet, as some Texas ranches are proving, helping to bring back large numbers of these endangered species can be a profitable pastime.
Holly Fretwell
It is the time of year for t
Today my colleague Laura Huggins and I spent an hour or so with Sandrine Bélie, a member of the Europea
Holly Fretwell
Last Saturday night (March 26) was Earth Hour. A time that, presumably, billions of people turn out their lights to support energy conservation.
Jane Shaw
by Jane S. Shaw
Jane Shaw
by Jane S. Shaw
Laura Huggins
by Laura Huggins

Features

Whitney Tilt
Today there are signs that we have grown increasingly complacent about our natural lands to the point where we risk not knowing how to find our way out…outdoors that is.
Carol Ferrie
We hate TV, but we have a favorite show…we hate electronic eavesdropping, but we love it when it is used to capture a fiendish criminal. We love to hate it. We hate to love it.
Kimberley Yablonski
With an ever increasing mound of scientific research indicating that kids who spend time outside tend to be smarter, happier, and healthier, the idea that children need nature is not novel.
Holly Fretwell
Fear mongering is effective because it feeds our emotions, but do such tactics actually help improve life on earth?

Web Exclusives

Perspectives

Megan Gurdon
Contemporary children are so drenched with eco-propaganda that it's almost a waste of resources. Like acid rain, but more persistent and corrosive, it dribbles down on them all day long.