Indians

Terry Anderson
By Terry L. Anderson, Bruce L. Benson and Thomas E. Flanagan
The New York TimesOpinion June 28, 2005 By John Tierney
Terry Anderson, Dominic Parker
Hoover Digest2004 No.3 Summer By Terry L. Anderson and Dominic Parker
Terry Anderson
Over the past three decades, the environmental movement has promoted a view of American Indians as the "original conservationists"--that is, "people so intimately bound to the land that they have left no mark upon it" (White and Cronon 1988, 417).
Terry Anderson
Wall Street JournalNov. 22, 1995 By Terry L. Anderson
Terry Anderson
Sovereign Nations or Reservations?An Economic History of American IndiansBy Terry L. Anderson
Terry Anderson
Terry L. Anderson Editor
Terry Anderson
By Terry L. Anderson [See research by Terry Anderson and Dominic Parker]
Terry Anderson, Dominic Parker
By Terry L. Anderson and Dominic P. Parker
Terry Anderson, Dominic Parker
By Terry L. Anderson and Dominic P. Parker
By Jay Ambrose
Terry Anderson, Dominic Parker
Until American Indians living on Reservations have secure property rights and a stable rule of law, they will remain isloated on islands of poverty in a sea of prosperity.
Terry Anderson
Fox Business News correspondent John Stossel ignited a fire under
Terry Anderson
By Terry L. Anderson
Terry Anderson
The uncertainties of tribal governance and judicial systems has a chilling effect on economic development on reservations. A point in case is the Grand Canyon Skywalk.
Annie Ireland, Todd Graham
In first-of-its-kind legislation, the National Park Service and the Oglala Sioux have proposed the 133,000-acre South Unit of Badlands National Park be turned into a Tribal National Park. Can it be done?
Reed Watson, Peter Hill, Shawn Regan, Laura Huggins
Listen as Aaron Flint of "Voices of Montana" talks with Reed Watson, P.J. Hill, Shawn Regan, and Laura Huggins about free market environmentalism.
Shawn Regan
Research fellow Shawn Regan talks with John Batchelor about his latest report, "Unlocking the Wealth of Indian Nations: Overcoming Obstacles to Tribal Energy Development."
Shawn Regan
Imagine if the government were responsible for looking after your best interests. How well would this work? Just ask Native Americans.
Shawn Regan
PERC's new Policy Perspective explains how the government keeps tribes from developing their natural resources.
Shawn Regan, Fred Thomas
How opposition to coal exports is impacting one of the poorest communities in Montana — the Crow Indian reservation.
Terry Anderson, Shawn Regan
In the Wall Street Journal, Terry Anderson and Shawn Regan explain how Washington rules prevent tribes from developing resources that could help lift them out of poverty.
Indian reservations contain more than $1 trillion worth of untapped energy resources. As Terry Anderson explains on the John Batchelor Show, tribes could unlock this tremendous wealth if they had the same rights as those living off reservations.
Terry Anderson, Shawn Regan
Indian reservations are hobbled by burdensome regulations and bureaucracy. Native Americans should be given the dignity they deserve and be freed from federal guardianship.
Ryan Abman, a PERC Graduate Fellow and a PhD candidate in the Department of Economics at the University of California-Santa Barbara, is examining the effects of political influence over local natural resources this summer at PERC. Ryan focuses on the Brazilian Amazon and how local politics affect deforestation. In particular, he is exploring what he calls the political logging cycle—the close connection between political elections and deforestation rates in Brazil.
Terry Anderson, Shawn Regan
Indian reservations contain more than $1 trillion worth of untapped energy resources. If tribes had the same rights as those living outside of reservations, they could unlock the tremendous wealth of their lands.
Terry Anderson
The "Skywalk" project could help lift 2,100 tribal members out of poverty, but a legal dispute may have killed the goose that could lay golden eggs. Worse yet, this could stifle investment across Indian Country.
Terry Anderson
Ten years ago, the Hualapai Tribe in Arizona signed an agreement with a developer, David Jin, to build a glass Skywalk out over the Grand Canyon. After it was built, the tribe abruptly abrogated the contract; initially a U.S.
Terry Anderson
Tribes that can resist the temptation to extract wealth at the expense of future growth have the best hope of overcoming poverty and becoming truly sovereign.
PERC sat down with Richard Todd and Susan Woodrow of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis to discuss community development and the economic future in Indian Country.
David Haddock
PERC begins a colloquium this week on property rights and liberty in Native American societies. The program focuses on the historical emergence of property rights and how these rights have impacted Native Americans.
Terry Anderson
Terry Anderson discusses how private property rights could improve reservation economies on "Voices of Montana" with Aaron Flint.
Sierra Crane-Murdoch
In this PERC Case Study, Sierra Crane-Murdoch explores the challenges facing a tribe atop the nation’s biggest oil play. While mineral owners off the reservation have earned thousands of dollars for each acre leased, most allottees within have earned only a few hundred.
Terry Anderson
PERC President Terry Anderson points out that American Indians and First Nations people can reach back into their rich cultural heritage and find institutions that rewarded individual initiative.
Terry Anderson
The link between natural resources, institutions, and economic prosperity is nowhere more apparent than on American Indian reservations.
Terry Anderson
The link between natural resources, institutions, and economic prosperity is nowhere more apparent than on American Indian reservations
Shawn Regan
PERC's Terry Anderson made an appearance on Stossel Friday night to discuss the causes of American Indian poverty. The video is here:
Shawn Regan
PERC's Terry Anderson will be on Stossel on the Fox Business Channel tonight to discuss property rights on Indian reservations.
Peter Hill
Some economic histories are valuable because they provide insights into events and places previously not fully explored, while others contribute through a well-formulated test of economic propositions. In Commerce by a Frozen Sea, Ann M. Carlos and Frank D. Lewis have given us a marvelous melding of the two. The authors have written a carefully researched and well-organized discussion of the early fur trade in the very northern reaches of North America as well as a fascinating use of basic economic theory. The book extends our understanding of the overall extent of the trade and the interaction between the European traders -- primarily the French and British -- and indigenous tribes.  Europe wanted furs, primarily beaver, and the resident tribal groups valued the commodities available from the more economically-developed countries.When Adam Smith published his Wealth of Nations in 1776, he devoted a bit more than a page to the Hudson Bay Company, which was over a hundred years old at that point, having been created by royal charter in 1670. Smith places his discussion of the Company in his section discussing the costs and benefits of joint stock companies, and thinks the Hudson Bay Company probably had a reasonable level of profits, despite some of the principal-agent problems inherent in such organization.Smith could have made the Company and its relations with the Native Americans in the region around Hudson Bay a prime example of one of his basic assumptions about human nature, “the propensity to truck, barter, and exchange one thing for another.”  He also argued that the division of labor is limited by the extent of the market  and he would have found in the activities of the Hudson Bay company a surprisingly robust case study of entrepreneurial efforts to further extend the market and hence the division of labor.Commerce by a Frozen Sea is, at its core, an account of the gains from trade when two very different cultures with very different resources and productive abilities come into contact. And that contact itself was not exogenous, but driven by farsighted individuals who were able to organize trade across thousands of miles in the most difficult of circumstances. The Hudson Bay was frozen for most of the year, so the outposts or “factories” along the edges of the Bay depended upon the yearly vessel that would bring rations for the Europeans stationed at the factory as well as trade goods. These goods were often ordered specifically by the Indians the year before. The ship would then load the furs that had accumulated at the trading post for the return trip to Europe.
Laura Huggins
Last week, PERC was featured on the Fox Business Channel's Stossel program for a Thanksgiving special giving thanks to property righ
In this policy series, Alison Berry continues her work on the quality of forests that result under different management schemes. She contrasts side-by-side forests in Montana. One is operated by the United States Forest Service under the watchful eye of Congress. The other is run by Indian tribes on reservation lands.

From the Editor

Laura Huggins
Exploring the relation between tribes, property rights and the market

Opinions

Terry Anderson
Dubbed the “First Nations Property Ownership Act,” the legislation would allow Canadian bands (tribes as they are known in the United States) to vote on whether to give individual Indians the right to own their land as private property.
David Haddock
It is well past time to hand management of trust assets over to the individuals who own them.

Features

At a time when there’s a spotlight on America’s richest 1%, a look at the country’s 310 Indian reservations—where many of America’s poorest 1% live—can be more enlightening.
These Plains Indians had a legal system based on accepted rules of conduct and individual rights.
D. Bruce Johnsen
British Columbia could resolve its conflicts over salmon by an auction that resembles the 'rivalry potlatches' of the past.
Terry Anderson
A return to property rights and the rule of law would restore economic strength and stewardship to American Indian Economies.
The reservation system, instituted in the nineteenth century, destroyed the successful property rights systems of the past.
Tribal sovereignty is an achievement, but just as important in enabling Indians to be entrepreneurial is recognizing the role of the individual.
Justin B. Richland
Will economic growth in the 21st century erode or augment tribal culture?
Richard Wright
A First Nation in British Columbia in rewriting the rules.
Te Maire Tau
Reinstating indigenous rights to own property and build an economy in New Zealand
Robert J. Miller
The lack of economic development on reservations is a major factor in creating the extreme poverty, unemployment, and the accompanying social issues that Indian nations face.
Ian Boisvert
Rugged, enchanting, and powerful coastlines surround New Zealand. The coastlines are powerful not just in wave energy but also as sources of cultural identity, commerce, and conflict.
John R. Bockstoce
The maritime fur trade of the Bering Strait was one aspect of the European expansion into the most remote regions of Asia and America. But as we have seen, it fit within a vast global exchange network.

Columns

Terry Anderson
Blackfeet Gathering, an oil painting of teepees, illustrates private property among American Indians. It is available by auction.
Terry Anderson
Restoring Indian Dignity

Perspectives

Different Constraints The various articles in your special issue (“American Indians and Property Rights,” June 2006) together illustrate a series of fundamentally important points.
Randy Simmons
Unconventional Entrepreneurs of the Navajo Nation