Saving Our Streams Through Water Markets

A Summary

A new handbook by Clay J. Landry, Saving Our Streams through Water Markets, is likely to become an essential guide for those interested in using water markets to protect fish and other wildlife in streams and rivers. Saving Our Streams gives practical advice about this rapidly emerging market for environmentalists, agency officials, ranchers, farmers, and others.

Throughout the West, coho salmon, bull trout, and other fish are in danger because many streams do not have enough water for them. Environmentalists have come to the rescue with a new protection tool: water markets. Water that would otherwise be diverted for irrigation or other purposes can now be kept in the river or stream through voluntary leases and purchases.

The handbook, published by PERC, has two goals. One is to present an up-to-date survey of the state of water marketing to protect stream flows. The other is to give specific advice about planning and negotiating water trades. This advice is based on the experience of water-market practitioners in environmental organizations and in public agencies.

The author, Clay J. Landry, is a research associate at PERC. Before joining PERC, he was a natural resource economist for the Oregon Water Resources Department, an economic consultant for the Oregon Water Trust, and a legislative analyst for Montana Trout Unlimited.

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Clay J. Landry is a PERC Research Associate. This article is based on "Unplugging the Everglades," a chapter in Government vs. Environment, edited by Donald R. Leal and Roger E. Meiners, forthcoming from Rowman & Littlefield (rowmanlittlefield.com).
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